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by senator rob portman, senator bob corker. republicans are saying he's probably going to easily win confirmation because he's probably one of the club. >> let's talk about another member of the club. susan, a much tougher fight would be if he chooses to nominate chuck hagel for defense. the coming attacks on chuck hagel will make the susan rice episode seem kwant. those attacks have already begun. send us hagel and we will make sure that every american knows that he's an antisemi-semite. he was asked about the influence of apec, a pro-israel lobby. the jewish lobby intimidates a lot of people up here. i'm a united states senator. i'm not an israeli senator. >> well, i'd certainly think he's going to be put through the ringer more than senator kerry who will be very, very easily confirmed. but hagel has a lot of friends in the senate. not as many as he used to because there's been some turnovers. some of the newer senators don't have the respect and consideration they might have for a former colleague. but he's got excellent credentials. he's got two purple hearts. he was an enlisted
, therefore, that will lead us in terms of price action over the next five days. bob pisani? >> if you look at the interday, we were positive on the day earlier on. we dropped in the middle of the day and some people are attributing this to concerns that the house leadership did not issue the 48 hour call for the whole house to come back into session and vote on a proposed plan even though there isn't one out there, some are interpreting this to mean there will be no deal certainly going into the weekend. of course, the time period on which we can do something now gets smaller and smaller. let me show you a couple sectors here. we talked about this mastercard report on sales only up 0.7%. luxury retailers getting hit hard. can i just point out that none of these luxury retailers have done very well this year. tiffany, coach, ralph lauren are negative on the year and have been even before today's report. michael kors is the standout in luxury. remember they went public about a year ago. that's had a great run, up about 60% this year. but that's the standout in retail. can i also point out th
, bob doll will be giving us his lineup for stocks. that's coming up at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive. david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will join us to give us some of his wisdom in a kaerc t can't-miss interview. a lot to talk about with him. in the meantime, why don't we get to some of today's top stories. we could see some movement in the fiscal cliff negotiations. house speaker boehner offering to raise the top tax rates on those making over $1 million a year as well as other measures amounting to $1 trillion in new revenue. that's in exchange for an equal amount in spending cuts. the white house has not yet accepted the proposal. >>> also, apple says it has sold more than 2 million in iphone 5s in china just over the last three days. that's the best ever debut for the iphone line in china. apple is china's second biggest market, although it did lose a lot of market share while they were waiting for that i5 to come out. and citi research has downgraded apple from a hold to a buy. you can see there just below $500. >>
. and as you see there, bob corker will join "the squawk pox" gang on monday morning. grover, always good to see you, thank you. >> thank you very much. >> president obama, congressional leaders meeting at the white house to avoid the fiscal cliff. we'll bring you the latest developments on that any minute now. >> also, we'll check up on health care, one of the year's best performing sectors. we'll find out if it's going to run out of steam in the new year and name some names for you coming up. >> and later on, big sky, big jump in estate taxes if congress fails to reach a deal on the cliff. we'll talk to a montana rancher who is pretty upset. coming up, montana's governor brian schweitzer is going to weigh in. >> looks like the meeting may have broken up. there goes nancy pelosi, and we are told now house speaker boehner may have already left, and, no, they are not talking to reporters. nancy is looking for her car to leave the white house, and we're not getting anybody talking to the reporters at this point, so maybe we'll get some -- and i'm told now the futures market in the after-hou
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
. >> reporter: for more on the fiscal cliff let's bring in bob sue sack, managing editor of the hill. thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me on. >> reporter: he says this is a slow walk for our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff, and if the president doesn't like the republican's plan he has an obligation to send them one that can pass both houses of congress as quickly as possible. what is the middle ground here? >> well, they are nowhere near the middle ground. a lot of posturing going on. i think you'll see that for at least another week or two. the sticking point is, it's tax rates, and speaker john boehner was asked a question of whether he could be flexible on that. he really didn't indicate he was going to do that. democrats say fresh off their election win he must do that. maybe it's not 250,000, maybe it's higher where they protect sphaupl businesses between 250,000 or 750,000 and a million. there has to be some type of compromise. if republicans are going to go for tax rate increases they'll have to get significant returns as far as the entitlement reforms. that is the
restrictions ends your virginity. you are the enemy. your thoughts? >> well, it's great that bob casey has come out for these things, but if all that happens at the end of the day is that we have a ban on a certain type of weapon or a certain type of magazine with a certain type of capacity, 100 bullets, let's say, we'll have failed here. you know, it's not just about the guns. it's how people get guns. what people have to do in order to get guns. we should be treating these more like automobile licenses. you should have to prove you know how to use these things. you should prove you understand the law around the use of guns and things like that. if we start talking about that, then we'll be realistic. i think what's happening now for a lot of these politicians is we've had this moment here in our culture which is pretty horrific, and they're running for the hills a little bit, running scared, so they're going to look for something they can do that is maybe better than nothing but largely cosmetic. just like the assault weapons ban was largely cosmetic. >> give me a ron reagan gun bill. >> a ro
by bob casey. >> he's not the only one. joe manchin, the senator from west virginia, on monday was saying this has changed his thinking. of course, these are two democrats -- >> but manchin hasn't said he will vote for these two bills. bobby casey said he will. it's different to have conversations, another to make a commitment. >> i think there will be more and more lawmakers who will follow what casey has done. i don't think he's the only one, and i think we'll start seeing some republicans -- >> it's the toughest case. let me go to ron reagan. i know pennsylvania defeated years ago joe clark, a great liberal senator, on this issue. first guy i ever voted for actually. now it's back. i know the people on the gun side of the argument, i know them closely. they will be out there vigilantly looking for any traitor they find, anybody who dares to vote for any kind of restriction, and any restrictions ends your virginity. you are the enemy. your thoughts? >> well, it's great that bob casey has come out for these things, but if all that happens at the end of the day is that we have a ban on a
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
be yours. well, if itmr. margin?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take
?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride, go fishing or just lay in the sun. we've got coastline to explore and wildlife to photograph. and there's world class dining with
't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to s
. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult relationship with the british as they're realizing that we are replacing them not only in the combat effectiveness, but as a superpower, um, how eisenhower kind of lets them down'sly, manages that -- easi
republican senator bob corker if a deal is likely and tell you how no deal could significantly impact everything from the price of milk to the price of gas. >>> we also look back at the life and legacy of general norman schwarzkopf. and a double agent tells us how facebook was used to infiltrate al qaeda. >>> but we begin this morning with today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >>> the house and republican have left town. the negotiations between the president and speaker have fallen apart. you can't legislate with yourself. >>> republicans have bent over backward. we wanted an agreement, but we had no takers. >> washington scrambles to avert the fiscal cliff. >>> president obama has asked the congressional leaders to meet at the white house today. >> if they cannot reach a deal, the economists warn that could trigger another recession. >> are they going to avoid a fiscal cliff, eric? [ laughter ] as stormin' norman has died. he commanded the u.s.-led international coalition and forced saddam hussein's forces out of kuwait. >>> some of the same states are bracing for yet anot
you the results on monday. next on the run down, ms. laura ingraham has some thoughts about the bob costas interview last night. later, we will read your mail on that. and then, is there a growing anti-christian bias in america? i think so. what do the culture warriors believe? those reports after these messages. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicio
's forces out of kuwait in 1991. bob scales on the phone with us now. general scales you wrote a book called certain victory and you have a lot of knowledge of the history of the iraq war but personal knowledge with this man. you call him truly the first great american hero after vietnam. your thoughts? >> that is exactly right, harris. remember, i come from the same generation as general schwarzkopf and the vector was the vindication of my generation report vietnam generation because it was our first great military victory after defeat in vietnam and he took that personally. i knew general schwarzkopf well, going back to his time as a major in the pentagon. he also carried in his sack this rock that had the sigma that went with the defeat in vietnam. when defeated the iraqi military in the plains of iraq, when was able to do that one of the first things he said at the truce tent was this is a vindication for my generation, harris. so detail on his life, general scales, many people may not know. he was born in trenton, new jersey. in fact, his father founded and was heading the new jersey st
obama named to be the new face of america's foreign policy. joining me now is bob schrum, senior advisor to john kerry's presidential campaign and now professor at nyu. bob, you've known senator kerry for a long time. what's your reaction to today's announcement? >> well, i think the president had the right line. he's the perfect choice. he's the perfect choice for three reasons. first, hillary clinton and her service in that role has changed the nature of it. people around the world have come to expect a very larnl, a very senior figure as secretary of state. people look at him and say he was almost president of the united states. they know him. they take him very seriously. secondly, reverend, as you know because you were in all of those debates with him, he has an extraordinary mastery of foreign policy. he understands it. he also understands how to move things. and, third, he has a remarkable coolness under pressure. when everybody wrote us off, he said he had no chance for the nomination. he just kept going, had no press following us. never once did i see him lose his temper. he kne
morning cincinnati, bob herzog called dance party friday every week. >> juliet: wiggle, wiggle, wiggle, wiggle. thanks, you guys. we'll see you on "the five" today. >> kelly: see you. gregg: last-ditch effort for a compromise in washington today days before a new year's deadline to reach a deal or watch the economy go off the cliff. i'm. patti ann: i'm patti ann browne. they will try to avoid the across the board tax hikes for 90% of the american households and deep spending cuts. so far little to no progguess has been reported. gregg: chief white house correspondent ed henry is in the white us. ed, what do we expect out the meeting if any at all? our expectations are a little bit low. >> reporter: you're exactly right, gregg, expectations have to be low. lawmakers of both parties in conjunction with the president have missed one deadline after another. we have been saying for a couple weeks they had to get moving get this completed before christmas in order to give the house and senate time to debate and end up voting on whatever package they come up with. now that we're days away fro
in michigan and he meets up with bob dole. the two of them nowhere near politics. both of them so wounded and talked all the time in that hospital about what they would do in the future. both wanted to be doctors but both so harmed that being a doctor was, at that point, just completely out of the question. they had to come up with other careers and i talked with both of them about their relationship a while back and they describe that time in the hospital. take a listen. >> i used to watch him play bridge. he was the best bridge player in the hospital. we sat around and talked about what we were going to do with the rest of our life. i said, bob, what are you going to be doing? and one thing about bob dole, he had had his life mapped out. really mapped out. he says, well, when i get back, i'll be a county attorney. then i'll be in the legislature. the first opening of congress, that's where i'll go. i said, gee, that's a good idea. >> inouye actually beat dole and said, i'm here in the congress, where are you? dole joined him and later were both world war ii heroes. this is a generation
chairman of this committee. pablo this committee from 1995 to 1997. -- bob led this committee from 1995 to 1997. welcome, bob. retired major-general ronald siegel. he currently serves as vice president enterprise executive for energy in the environment for colorado state university and ohio state university. led a distinguished career in the u.s. air force. d.o.d. executive force base, and prior to that, director of defense research and technology. he flew two space shuttles. we certainly welcome you. >> we welcome, honorable marion blakey, president and ceo representing more than 150 leading aerospace manufacturers. ms. thank you served a five-year term as administrator of the f.a.a. -- ms. blakey served a five- year term as administrator of the f.a.a. we do certainly welcome you. but associate prof. for space science and engineering at the university of michigan, specialist in robotic exploration and space and team leader for the development for the fast imaging plasma spectrometer on messenger spacecraft. we certainly welcome you. dr. scott pages a director of the space policy instit
. >>> republican senator bob corker of tennessee has offered proposals in recent weeks to break the stalemate in congress. senator, good morning, good to see you. >> good morning, jeff good to be with you. >> are we going over the cliff? >> well it depends on what that means. i think 98% of the people in our country can be assured that at some point over the next short period of time, their income taxes are going to be the same but this congress as you know has been more prepared than any to deal with the big issues our nation faces and what you're seeing is a lack of courage to deal with the spending issues. unfortunately, you know today the average american doesn't realize that there's 40% of government services that they're not paying for. only one-third of medicare is paid for by those people who actually use it and because there's been this charade going on, where the left and right basically have conspired together to shield the american people from the true cost of government, we really don't have any constituency here to help reduce spending because we have not
there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, w
. laura ingraham has some thoughts about the bob costas interview last night. later, we will read your mail on that. and then, is there a growing anti-christian bias in america? i think so. what do the culture warriors believe? those reports after these messages. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ♪ ...could end with adding a close frien. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offerg some of our best vals of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. giv
, everybody, the best thing to watch this month, and bob pisani pointed this out. the transportation stocks have been very strong. china has been strong. mandy, you know, japan has been strong, and the banks have been strong. to me there's an underlying strength to the market when some of the bodyguards have been doing well so i think the market wants to do better. that having been said the fiscal cliff will turn out to be not a maxi deal but a mini deal and will clip the economy not by 1% but a 2% and a 60% chance something will get done but that's where we come out on it right now. a little bit harder hit to the economy. >> don't adjust your sets, everybody. this is what bob sounds like today. >> this is a different exchange here. >> not doing your imitation of david? >> what do you think that the seasonal factors are a major reason why the markets are holding up so well? if you look at the havens, gold, treasuries, for example, the dollar, there's no sign of panic in the haven. >> silver is down. you've seen a little bit of a lift in the vix, closer to 20. that's not bad, a normalization
we just heard from kenny and from bob. kenny, you were shaking your head, so angry at what is going on down there. the mark set telling them to get to work. and it's ridiculous, nothing is happening. >> i think the mark set tired of giving them a free pass. i think the last couple weeks, the market has been giving them room to negotiate. i think after what we saw last night, the mark set disgusted as it rightly should be, as our investors. >> thank you. sorry. >> i think this story today that they are trying to say this is strategic on boehner's part. i'm scratching my head. what is strategic in grand standing about how to pass it. then pulling out because he had no support at all. then today the senator saying, they misunderstood. what did they misunderstand? >> yeah. i think the important thing -- by the way, john harwood is hysterical describing what happened. that perfect. there are people trying to buy the lows of the day right after the open. remember this is quadruple witching. so there is a lot of volume down here. now we are essentially sitting a lows of the day. as we brea
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
member the president said in a debate, the debate, he said that i didn't come up with this. then bob woodward came out and said, yes, you did. you know, both a top aide said that you guys came up with this idea of the white house. look in the mirror, right. >> that's exactly right. a lot of people on wall street and in the media are saying just don't do it, don't go over the cliff. you know, and then that shows a we that we still have a 16 trillion-dollar national debt. so when the world are we going to get serious about what the american people say they want, which is reduction in the debt so that we don't become a country that looks like greece. [talking over each other] gregg: capitol hill and pennsylvania avenue, maybe they just think 16 trillion, 25 trillion, who cares. maybe they don't think it has a depressive effect on economic growth, and soaking up the credit markets, which women's businesses. >> that's exactly right. we don't have to wonder what this will go by. all we have to do is look over the pond and see what's happening in countries like greece and italy and spain an
on the state department during a time of fiscal austerity. host: here is a follow-up from senator bob corker who will take over as the ranking republican in the senate foreign relations committee in the 113th congress. [video clip] >> you were fully aware and either you send people there with a security or you send them there. i don't understand why you did not send a notification out, but the cables coming in, with concerns about security, why didn't you do just what you did with this -- seeking additional funds? i did not understand. the appropriations committee has never received from the state department a notification asking to shift funds for security in benghazi. i just want you to tell me why that didn't happen. you do it all the time. it happens almost weekly. >> senator, as you know, we are constantly evaluating our security posture. we are constantly reevaluating where we need funds. and we are constantly by winning the current situation on the ground in all of our countries. as you are well aware, we have risks all over the world and we are constantly evaluating and determining -
other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. he would do things on -- in secret. dole takes over baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. and -- they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. the did work together. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. if senators voted based on secret ballot, baker would have won. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator byrd. senator byrd decides to crush two democrats. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. -- the way the senate works. there is a rebellion on the senate floor. everyo
. it is not that they do not fight or have differences. but they did keep each other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. dole takes over maker as leader . -- baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. it senators voted on the secret alec, aker would have -- based on secret ballot, baker would have onwon. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator erred -- where i describe senator byrd. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. there is a rebellion on the sen
have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> paul o'neill may be best known as secretary of the treasury under president george w. bush, but it's a difficult call he made years before that that altered the course of a major american company and literally saved lives in the process. >> i can't say to you, you know, this is all one group or all another group. >> in 1987 o'neill became ceo of one of the largest and oldest aluminum companies in the world, alcoa. on the eve of its centennial, the storied corporation was in trouble. inefficient, rapid expansion had left profits dwindling and moral waning. putting o'neill in charge was a big change. in nearly 100 years, alcoa had never hired an out of house ceo. someone who had not climbed through the ranks of the tightly-knit management system and who was not well-versed in metal making. the company was in for a surprise with the first decision o'neill made. executives and shareholders thought it was bizarre, unorthodox, and indifferent to the bottom line. so what was that decision? let's find out. when you came to alcoa, descr
that they were going to firewall is off the ticket. it was run by bob hannigan the national chairman who ran the st. louis machine that got chairman rehab acted in 1940 and ed pauly. at holly was the kolshorn yet oil millionaire who said i went into politics when i realize it was cheaper to elect a new congressman to buy the old one. he leaders going to get indicted for good reason. >> host: his name is on the -- >> guest: the build alien -- the pavilion, exact way. they decided they would try to surround roosevelt with all the people who were hostile to wallace if wallace is on the ticket. in 1941 when henry luce made his famous speech wrote his editorial saying the 20th century's going to be the ends century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and military old and culturally coming made a famous speech. the 20th century should not be the american century, should be the century the common man so what we need is the worldwide people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and the russian revolution and called for ending impe
. the cleaning up begins all across the country. bob, these projections... they're... optimistic. productivity up, costs down, time to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we'
, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. it's an awesome responsibility. i know right now i have the lives of over 150,000 americans, men and women, in my hands. i don't want to make a mistake. but i'm human, and i recognize that i might. and i worry about that. regardless of the outcome, when this whole thing is over, i can still say to myself, you can gave it your best shot, then that's got to be enough. >> morning. it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a look at new york city. back with us on set, brian sullivan. fortune magazine's leigh gallagher, reverend al sharpton, and richard wolffe in washington. obviously, that was general norman schwarzkopf on the screen who passed away yesterd
that wasn't a fun time. >> not like in a room having a cocktail. >> dave: how about republican bob corker who talked to greta about the spending cuts that they would like to see from the democrats thus far not on the table. it's a shame in this nation where every developed country in the world knows our fiscal cliff is our fiscal solvency you have to have these leverage points. sit down and solve the problem because we know it's our greatest threat. that's not the case here. we have a president who has not laid out a plan. is he on yulingsly a spendaholic. >> dave: here is the problem for republicans though. if there is no deal out of the senate he will say okay i need an up or down vote on the $250,000 up or down mark. if republicans want to go on record to say no on that. that's going to be very politically dangerous for john boehner in the house. that's the bottom line. >> juliet: i know you are getting a lot of tweets. mine is like i blame, this i blame that guy. it's interesting to hear what you guys have to say about that first, let's go to peter doocy. what happens this weekend as
, bob. we should let our viewers know, they might recognize you, you were on "fox & friends" three times in the past couple of years. >> three times. >> alisyn: when you were talking about work to help vets you didn't share were you in the middle of a crisis. take us back to three years ago, were you in china and your wife called. christy called and said there had been an accident and first didn't think it would be that bad and word came in that it was very serious. and we arranged a series of conference calls with the doctors and at one point, the doctor said to me, i asked her, how, what she thought was going to happen she couldn't tell, she couldn't guarantee he would live another 15 minutes. at that point i asked both of my brothers to find a catholic priest to give bobby the last rites. >> alisyn: bobby, do you remember the accident? >> no, i don't. no recollection at all. >> alisyn: what's the first thing that you remember afterwards? >> first thing i remember afterwards was waking up in the hospital. >> alisyn: and of course, shocked that you knew that your life was forever change
with china and the united states right now, and what do you see as the challenges in the years ahead? >> bob, thank you very much, and it's great to be back at csis and to be with my friends and colleagues on the panel. i very much appreciate the opportunity. i think as all of you have seen, over the last several years the obama administration, in really a bipartisan spirit, has sought to step up our game in the asia-pacific region, to increase our diplomatic, our commercial, our strategic and our political interactions really across the board. and when we think about it -- it's been termed either the pivot or rebalancing -- a key component of that is frankly our desire to improve and increase our interactions and our relationship with china. we all recognize its importance on the global stage. and frankly, the region and the world demands that the united states and china make an extraordinary effort to make sure that our relationship is strong and stable and predictable. you referred to this long history of what are often referred to as hegemonic transitions. one of the things i would say i
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
, bob. we did. got it. >>> well, washington's division and dysfunction threatened our economic recovery, some american cities are working their way back after decades of tough times. recently, i traveled to youngstown, ohio, and caught a glimpse of hope deep in the rust belt. >> this is your father's first restaurant? >> the first one. >> what street was it, do you remember? >> wick avenue. >> wick avenue. >> my grandmother's lived in youngstown, ohio, for more than 95 years. >> yes, i've seen it in many different phases. my grandfather came here from greece. he opened a restaurant, the american dream. >> but he taught himself english. he taught himself to read the newspaper, and he became a very successful businessman. as he would say, only in america. youngstown was prosperous, and downtown youngstown was really prosperous. it was wonderful to go to downtown youngstown and be all dressed up in gloves and hat and going in and out of the shops and having lunch downtown. it was exciting. >> but that prosperity didn't last. youngstown ohio was the manufacturing backbone of this country bu
representing opposite parties ninteen the lifelong friendship. we can look to john mccain, bob kerrey, chuck hagel, john kerry who despite facing enormous as challenges of war upon returning home, took the lead to normalize relationships in vietnam in helping to heal a wounded nation. it's now our responsibility to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before us. as we in keeping with the mission of united states the united states naval academy assumed the highest responsibilities of command and citizenship in government. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen we are going to make a quick transition in the front of the room to set up for the q&a. by showing a brief video. cue the video. [laughter] if you haven't noticed we have been having a little bit of technical difficulty here today. here we go. ladies and jones meant the video you're you are about to watch is a call to action. we encourage you to buy the book and join the cause. thank you very much. [applause] >> he 9/11. we are prepared to serve in uniform but were not sure how ,-com,-com ma responding to responding
, and one final thought, i'd like the idea that lamar alexander and senator corker. >> bob coaching, right. >> the $1 trillion debt ceiling raised for $1 trillion of spending cuts, i think that's pretty good. i know we've heard it before. senator corker talked on the santelli exchange with me a week ago about it, but everyone is thinking about the debt ceiling, and i think that's where the meat is going to be, and the next three charts that we're showing are from august 5th of 2011 when s&p took away our aaa rating, and no matter how people remember it, the markets certainly didn't remember it at all. it didn't slow down the rally in the dollar, the stocks or any of the trade in the fixed income markets with yields dropping. >> we were talking about that issue on "street signs," rick. talking about andy brenner. the markets after a quick knee neck reaction kind of shrugged it off, right? >> i don't even remember. that's why i put it up. i heard andrew. i don't even remember a quick reaction the other way. it was totally ignored, and in some ways in stocks it was actually off to the markets
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